There is more wisdom in your body
Than in your deepest philosophies.

— Nietzsche

Recent Reflections

  • The Search for Happiness

    There is a beautiful song called ‘October Song’ written by Robin Williamson from The Incredible String Band who were a pioneering 1960‘s psychedelic folk band. From the first time I heard the song, I loved the verse: “I used to search for happiness, And I used to follow pleasure, But I found a door behind
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  • I Can’t Get no Satisfaction

    I recently came across an article by the writer Charlotte Lieberman entitled “Mindlessly Scrolling for Satisfaction. How to Navigate the Temptation of Distraction in the Information Age.” The irony of finding this article whilst scrolling through my Facebook timeline was not lost on me but I was interested to read what she had to say. 
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  • Seeing the Blossom: Reflections on opening to the nowness of everything

    In March 1994 Melvyn Bragg did a celebrated interview with the playwrite Dennis Potter, who was then dying of cancer. The interview was later published under the title Seeing the Blossom. Dennis Potter spoke of how the imminence of death gave his experience of the world a heightened intensity. “At this season, the blossom is
    Read more…

  • It’s A Wonderful Life

    Many years ago I found myself in a cinema in Manchester during the festive season. As the lights went up at the end of the film, I looked around to see people wiping tears from their eyes, and likewise during the course of the film I had been moved to tears myself on several occasions.
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  • Aldous Huxley’s Head & Heart

    The English author and intellectual Aldous Huxley once said you could sum up the history of every man and woman who has ever lived with the following words, “I see the better and approve it, the worse is what I pursue”. If we were merely rational beings, then our knowing would be indistinguishable from our
    Read more…

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Archive of Reflections

photo of ManjunagaManjunaga began his yoga practice in 1998 and draws from his exploration of the practices of yoga and Buddhism to create an embodied practice that addresses the body, heart and mind.

His style of yoga teaching combines dynamic, flowing movement with stilling, calming postures to experience yoga as a deepening awareness of breath, cultivating peace of mind.

Manjunaga has trained with a number of teachers including Donna Farhi, Sarah Powers and qualified with Simon Low and the Yoga Academy in 2008.

In 2005 Manjunaga was ordained into the Triratna Buddhist Order where he was given the name Manjunaga which means kind wisdom. He has been exploring the insights and practices of meditation and Buddhism for over 20 years and draws from his in-depth training in Buddhist meditation practices. He has taught meditation courses at the Manchester Buddhist Centre for many years as well as on yoga & Buddhist retreats.

Manjunaga feels that yoga is an awareness practice, offering us an opportunity to become more fully embodied in our experience; this allows for a greater sensitivity to our emotional and physical well-being, allowing us to open to a natural state of open, relaxed awareness and a deepening insight into our essential nature.

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Manjunaga is an excellent teacher. His passion and focus for all that is yoga is infectious.

— Andrew J Parkinson

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